UNSC adopts sanctions against N.Korea

UNSC adopts sanctions against N.Korea

Nikki Haley, the US Ambassador to the United Nations, claimed that the new sanctions, levied in response to Pyongyang's November 29 ballistic missile test, went even further than sanctions passed in September that, at the time, were called the toughest yet.

The resolution seeks to ban almost 90 percent of refined petroleum product exports to North Korea by capping them at 500,000 barrels a year and, in what diplomats said was a last-minute change, demands the repatriation of North Koreans working overseas within 24 months, instead of 12 months as first proposed.

The US-drafted resolution were aimed at further cutting Pyongyang's access to hydrocarbons and order the repatriation of North Koreans working outside the country, according to diplomatic sources.

All 15 members, including China and Russian Federation, voted in favor of the resolution. Last week, US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told the council that the "pressure campaign must and will continue until denuclearization is achieved", as he backtracked from his offer to hold unconditional talks with Pyongyang.

North Korea, she said, is "this most tragic example of evil in the modern world".

According to the US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley, "It (the resolution) sends the unambiguous message to Pyongyang that further defiance will invite further punishments and isolation".

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A week after U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called out Russian Federation and China for their support of Kim Jong Un's regime, the 15-member Security Council passed its fourth resolution against Pyongyang in 13 months on Friday.

It had also called for the halt of what they say is "brutal sanctions" after a previous set of sanctions imposed in the country after its September 3 test constituted genocide.

US diplomats have made clear they are seeking a diplomatic solution but have proposed new, tougher sanctions to ratchet up pressure on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The United States stations 28,500 troops in the South, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War.

It's a move that analysts said could have a significant impact on the isolated country's struggling economy.

Specifically, the new resolution cuts deliveries of products including diesel and kerosene by nearly 90 percent, to the equivalent of 500,000 barrels per year starting January 1.

China, however, raised objections at those sanctions and the request to ban the 10 ships from ports worldwide will again be considered on December 28.

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